The Day the Music Died…

Don Mc Lean  was right.  Music is dead.  OK, so music isn’t really dead, but as far as The National Academy of Recording Arts is concerned, music may not be dead yet, but music doesn’t matter anymore.  If music actually mattered to the Academy, Neil Young would not have been nominated in the same category as John Mayer.  John belongs in a musical category, and Neil, well, maybe he should have been in the “Who Hates Bush the Most” category would have been a better pick for him.

The Dixie Chicks would not have bested John Mayer either.  Walking away with 5 Grammy awards, feeling “vindicated”, while they cry (literally) about not having a genre anymore, they freely admitted that they won, not because of music, but politics.  Contrast that with Carrie Underwood’s graceful acceptance speech, where she thanked Simon from American Idol, a move that raised more than a few eyebrows, and you might begin to see why the Chicks don’t get airplay on country radio anymore.

There were a few bright spots, though.  Smokey Robinson and Lionel Richie both gave great performances.  Rascal Flats and Carrie Underwood were outstanding, and I say that being someone who does not really like country music.  John Mayer was excellent. 

Finally, the best part was the beginning.  The TV announcer came on and announced the beginning of the awards.  Then, a British bass player, and American guitar player, with a British drummer took the stage.  The bass player said, “Ladies and gentlemen, we’re the Police, and we’re back!”  The reunion tour starts in May. 

Nothing the Chicks did or said could have ruined that particular moment for me.  After 25 years, the Police are on tour again, and Fiction Plane is the opening act.  Fortunately, in some parts of the world, music is not dead.  www.thepolicetour.com

Paul C. Quillman

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…I’ll Be Watching…(Gordon, Andy and Stewart)

Every breath you take

Every move you make

Every bond you break

Every step you take

I’ll be watching you

Every single day; Every word you say; Every game you play; Every night you stay; I’ll be watching you 

(Lyric excerpt from: Every Breath You Take, preformed by The Police)

Monday, FoxNews.com‘s Roger Friedman reported news that fans of 80’s pop rock have longed to hear for 25 years:

The Police are secretly rehearsing in Vancouver for a major, as-yet-unannounced appearance on the 2007 Grammy Awards.

That is not completely unprecedented, The Police did do a small set when they were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.  But this time it is different.  One paragraph down is this little jem:

And — surprise of surprises — this should guarantee an announcement forthcoming of a huge North American tour, followed by dates in Europe, all beginning in late spring.

The last Police tour was in 1983-1984.  Ego’s got in the way (lets face it, money played a large part of it), and there was not another tour.  Sting recorded his first solo record The Dream of the Blue Turtles, and it was a hit.  There was an attempted reunion tour planned for 1986, but the idea never materialized. 

Now, on the 30th anniversary of their first single being released, and 25th anniversary since they have toured, The Police put their ego’s aside ( we hope) and give it another shot.  We may even get extra lucky and get another studio record.

Sting, Andy Summers, and Stewart Copeland all have official press releases about the Grammy gig on their website’s, and except for John Mayer, is there any other reason to watch the Grammy’s this year?

I guess that until there is an official tour announcement, we should hope that that “…little black spot in the sun today…” is the impending announcement, otherwise, I may be the “King of Pain”.  Not that I think that Every Little Thing They Do Is Magic, but well, they are just such good musicians.

Here is a pic taken by Stewart Copeland showing the practice stage in Vancouver:

Stewart also has some interesting news about the 30 anniversary of The Police, and what  A&M (their record label) plan to do.  No official word of a tour, but the demand must be deafening. I bet you can even hear it  “Walking on the Moon”.