The 5th and Final Cylon

200px-Tory_CaptainsHand.JPG200px-Galen_Tyrol_promo.jpg

For those of you who, like me, are addicts of Battlestar Galactica, you have wondered for almost a year, who is the 5th  and final Cylon?  At the end of season 3, we find that Chief Tyrol, Sam Anders, Tory Foster, and Saul Tigh , are 4 of the final 5.  Producer and creator of the series, Ronald Moore, has held out on who the final Cylon is, much to everyone’s frustration, but we watch it anyway.  Why?  Because Battlestar Galactica is just so good, and you should be watching it too.

Catching up on the 100 or so blogs I subscribe to, I ran across the answer.  Actually, this post at IMAO.com is where I started to find the answer.  They linked to this post at Chris Palmer’s blog.  The picture he has comparing Saul Tigh and John Mc Cain is mccain.john.mediaviolence.9.14.00.jpgfrightening.tigh.jpg

Maybe John Mc Cain isn’t such a bad choice after all?

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For Those with a Spice Addiction…

Arrakis.  Dune.  Desert Planet.

I saw the news here first. 

Then I went here.

Then I checked for a more official word, here, here and here.

It would seem that the sleeper has finally awakened, and the spice will flow again.  Fremen will come from every sietch will rejoice to see the return of Maud’Dib, who will bring about the fall of Padishah Emperor Shaddam Corrino IV, again.

I do hope that Sting will reprise the role of Feyd Harkonnen.

The Day the Music Died…

Don Mc Lean  was right.  Music is dead.  OK, so music isn’t really dead, but as far as The National Academy of Recording Arts is concerned, music may not be dead yet, but music doesn’t matter anymore.  If music actually mattered to the Academy, Neil Young would not have been nominated in the same category as John Mayer.  John belongs in a musical category, and Neil, well, maybe he should have been in the “Who Hates Bush the Most” category would have been a better pick for him.

The Dixie Chicks would not have bested John Mayer either.  Walking away with 5 Grammy awards, feeling “vindicated”, while they cry (literally) about not having a genre anymore, they freely admitted that they won, not because of music, but politics.  Contrast that with Carrie Underwood’s graceful acceptance speech, where she thanked Simon from American Idol, a move that raised more than a few eyebrows, and you might begin to see why the Chicks don’t get airplay on country radio anymore.

There were a few bright spots, though.  Smokey Robinson and Lionel Richie both gave great performances.  Rascal Flats and Carrie Underwood were outstanding, and I say that being someone who does not really like country music.  John Mayer was excellent. 

Finally, the best part was the beginning.  The TV announcer came on and announced the beginning of the awards.  Then, a British bass player, and American guitar player, with a British drummer took the stage.  The bass player said, “Ladies and gentlemen, we’re the Police, and we’re back!”  The reunion tour starts in May. 

Nothing the Chicks did or said could have ruined that particular moment for me.  After 25 years, the Police are on tour again, and Fiction Plane is the opening act.  Fortunately, in some parts of the world, music is not dead.  www.thepolicetour.com

Paul C. Quillman

…I’ll Be Watching…(Gordon, Andy and Stewart)

Every breath you take

Every move you make

Every bond you break

Every step you take

I’ll be watching you

Every single day; Every word you say; Every game you play; Every night you stay; I’ll be watching you 

(Lyric excerpt from: Every Breath You Take, preformed by The Police)

Monday, FoxNews.com‘s Roger Friedman reported news that fans of 80’s pop rock have longed to hear for 25 years:

The Police are secretly rehearsing in Vancouver for a major, as-yet-unannounced appearance on the 2007 Grammy Awards.

That is not completely unprecedented, The Police did do a small set when they were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.  But this time it is different.  One paragraph down is this little jem:

And — surprise of surprises — this should guarantee an announcement forthcoming of a huge North American tour, followed by dates in Europe, all beginning in late spring.

The last Police tour was in 1983-1984.  Ego’s got in the way (lets face it, money played a large part of it), and there was not another tour.  Sting recorded his first solo record The Dream of the Blue Turtles, and it was a hit.  There was an attempted reunion tour planned for 1986, but the idea never materialized. 

Now, on the 30th anniversary of their first single being released, and 25th anniversary since they have toured, The Police put their ego’s aside ( we hope) and give it another shot.  We may even get extra lucky and get another studio record.

Sting, Andy Summers, and Stewart Copeland all have official press releases about the Grammy gig on their website’s, and except for John Mayer, is there any other reason to watch the Grammy’s this year?

I guess that until there is an official tour announcement, we should hope that that “…little black spot in the sun today…” is the impending announcement, otherwise, I may be the “King of Pain”.  Not that I think that Every Little Thing They Do Is Magic, but well, they are just such good musicians.

Here is a pic taken by Stewart Copeland showing the practice stage in Vancouver:

Stewart also has some interesting news about the 30 anniversary of The Police, and what  A&M (their record label) plan to do.  No official word of a tour, but the demand must be deafening. I bet you can even hear it  “Walking on the Moon”.

The Left Melting Down, and How to Save a TV Show

Originally posted 1/18/06

Looking over the message boards that NBC has for The Book of Daniel, I get the sense that the left can’t take what they dish out. For some reason, God has no place in the public forum, but anything and everything else does.

For some odd reason that I am unable to fathom, it is good to see a family with a bumbling idiot drug addicted priest whose wife has a martini addiction, and who’s kids, father and boss are morally bankrupt is great television. Oh, let’s not forget the caricature of Jesus: Nice, easy going, friendly, and all around great guy, unable to be the least bit sovereign. He seems to be so weak; that he has no ability to change lives without human cooperation. And there is the premise that all people are basically good. All of this love and flowers and goodness of man would make even Pelagius sick.

But it is unimaginably reprehensible for a group of people to address their concerns about a particular TV show. That has happened in Nashville and 3 or 4 other markets (why all the fuss of 4 or 5 markets. You have all of the rest of them showing it)

We live in a free market society. If a customer (viewer) does lot like a product (TV show) they have the right to express their concerns to those responsible for that product. They can turn off the TV, but they can also inform the station, the advertisers and those who are responsible for the production of that show that unless they want the consumers money, they will have to produce a product the consumer wants, and until that is done, the TV stations as well as the advertisers can expect none of the consumers money. There is no censorship here, that is just simple high school econ 101. In the case of Nashville WSMV decided they wanted the patronage of those who called and complained about the show. They complained, not enough people called in and praised the show, so WSMV pulled it. There was no censoring, they were just simply giving the consumers they heard from what they wanted. Many on the left did this kind of thing when Mel Gibson’s movie came out, so what is the problem with the Church doing it in this case? Oh, wait a minute; the rules are different for the left and the right. Sorry, my mistake.

There is a post by someone claiming to be Jack Kenny, the creator of The Book of Daniel. Here is the first paragraph:

First, I want to THANK all of you for the myriad messages of SUPPORT I’ve seen on this and many other boards and sites. Most everyone seems to understand that this is NOT any kind of attack or mocking of Christianity, but rather simply a fictional story in which the characters happen to be Christian. And also, very good people – despite being distilled down to their one or two flaws, something I don’t think any real person would care to have done to them either. So again, I thank you for your unwavering support and the fascinating discussion I’ve been witness to on these sites.

For the remainder of this entry, I will assume that the poster is Mr. Kenny, and will make a retraction if the opposite is proven to be true.

Mr. Kenny, this show IS an attack on the historic, orthodox Christian faith. I am not at all opposed to all of these issues being tackled in an intelligent, and Biblical way. Weather you like it or not, and weather you intended to or not, you are not answering the fundamental question in the situations you create: how does the Gospel change these lives? Another question is what does the Gospel require of us when we see our pastors family struggling? I am not looking for stones to throw, I am looking for people coming along side a troubled family, and walking with them through their insanity. I am looking for an elder board that loves the pastor well enough to carry the priest and his family through some tough circumstances.

I know families who have had to deal with drug addicts, alcoholics, sex addicts, and kids who deal with homosexuality. There is no magic formula for dealing with these issues. Overbearing condemnation is just as destructive as letting the desire for friends and family to “just be happy”. What about healthy? What about holy? Life is far too difficult to just reduce Biblical sanity to “happiness”.

Scripture tells us that there is none who is good, except One. That One is the Creator of the universe. The Creator alone has the right to define what is good. He alone has the right to define what love is. He alone has the right to define right and wrong.

You have taken that One, and reduced Him to a nice moral friend. The Jesus we read of in Scripture bears no resemblance to the Jesus you have created in your show. You will find that when there is such an obvious difference between what we see on TV, and what we read about in Scripture, the Church will not take it lightly. We will not sit by and allow His character to be diluted in the way you have done. The reason that The Passion was embrace by the Church, and your show is garnering such opposition is on this one point: The Church believed that Mel Gibson sought to portray Jesus as He is, not how Mel would like Jesus to be. Your show has shown Jesus to be something else altogether.

The Church is made up of sinful, people. The best of us are in desperate need of the grace of Jesus every second of our lives. However, we will not allow Jesus to be diluted as you, and others before you, have done.

Don’t give us some show that makes the people more moral. That is a facade and we can smell it a mile off. Rather, give us a show that shows us Jesus as He really is. You have shown us that we as humans are far worse off that we think, now, save the show and show us Jesus loving us far more than we dare hope or dream possible. Give us a show that shows that Jesus loves us far more than we could ever deserve, but loves too much to leave us as we are. Show us the Biblical Gospel, and we will set our VCR’s; DVR’s, TIVO’s, and DVD recorders to watch.

Posted by Paul C. Quillman at 1/18/2006 11:17:00 PM

The Left Melting Down, and How to Save a TV Show

Looking over the message boards that NBC has for The Book of Daniel, I get the sense that the left can’t take what they dish out. For some reason, God has no place in the public forum, but anything and everything else does.

For some odd reason that I am unable to fathom, it is good to see a family with a bumbling idiot drug addicted priest whose wife has a martini addiction, and who’s kids, father and boss are morally bankrupt is great television. Oh, let’s not forget the caricature of Jesus: Nice, easy going, friendly, and all around great guy, unable to be the least bit sovereign. He seems to be so weak; that he has no ability to change lives without human cooperation. And there is the premise that all people are basically good. All of this love and flowers and goodness of man would make even Pelagius sick.

But it is unimaginably reprehensible for a group of people to address their concerns about a particular TV show. What has happened in Nashville and 3 or 4 other markets (why all the fuss of 4 or 5 markets. You have all of the rest of them showing it)

We live in a free market society. If a customer (viewer) does lot like a product (TV show) they have the right to express their concerns to those responsible for that product. They can turn off the TV, but they can also inform the station, the advertisers and those who are responsible for the production of that show that unless they want the consumers money, they will have to produce a product the consumer wants, and until that is done, the TV stations as well as the advertisers can expect none of the consumers money. There is no censorship here, that is just simple high school econ 101. In the case of Nashville WSMV decided they wanted the patronage of those who called and complained about the show. They complained, not enough people called in and praised the show, so WSMV pulled it. There was no censoring, they were just simply giving the consumers they heard from what they wanted. Many on the left did this kind of thing when Mel Gibson’s movie came out, so what is the problem with the Church doing it in this case? Oh, wait a minute; the rules are different for the left and the right. Sorry, my mistake.

There is a post by someone claiming to be Jack Kenny, the creator of The Book of Daniel. Here is the first paragraph:

First, I want to THANK all of you for the myriad messages of SUPPORT I’ve seen on this and many other boards and sites. Most everyone seems to understand that this is NOT any kind of attack or mocking of Christianity, but rather simply a fictional story in which the characters happen to be Christian. And also, very good people – despite being distilled down to their one or two flaws, something I don’t think any real person would care to have done to them either. So again, I thank you for your unwavering support and the fascinating discussion I’ve been witness to on these sites.

For the remainder of this entry, I will assume that the poster is Mr. Kenny, and will make a retraction if the opposite is proven to be true.

Mr. Kenny, this show IS an attack on the historic, orthodox Christian faith. I am not at all opposed to all of these issues being tackled in an intelligent, and Biblical way. Weather you like it or not, and weather you intended to or not, you are not answering the fundamental question in the situations you create: how does the Gospel change these lives? Another question is what does the Gospel require of us when we see our pastors family struggling? I am not looking for stones to throw, I am looking for people coming along side a troubled family, and walking with them through their insanity. I am looking for an elder board that loves the pastor well enough to carry the priest and his family through some tough circumstances.

I know families who have had to deal with drug addicts, alcoholics, sex addicts, and kids who deal with homosexuality. There is no magic formula for dealing with these issues. Overbearing condemnation is just as destructive as letting the desire for friends and family to “just be happy”. What about healthy? What about holy? Life is far too difficult to just reduce Biblical sanity to “happiness”.

Scripture tells us that there is none who is good, except One. That One is the Creator of the universe. The Creator alone has the right to define what is good. He alone has the right to define what love is. He alone has the right to define right and wrong.

You have taken that One, and reduced Him to a nice moral friend. The Jesus we read of in Scripture bears no resemblance to the Jesus you have created in your show. You will find that when there is such an obvious difference between what we see on TV, and what we read about in Scripture, the Church will not take it lightly. We will not sit by and allow His character to be diluted in the way you have done. The reason that The Passion was embrace by the Church, and your show is garnering such opposition is on this one point: The Church believed that Mel Gibson sought to portray Jesus as He is, not how Mel would like Jesus to be. Your show has shown Jesus to be something else altogether.

The Church is made up of sinful, people. The best of us are in desperate need of the grace of Jesus every second of our lives. However, we will not allow Jesus to be diluted as you, and others before you, have done.

Don’t give us some show that makes the people more moral. That is a facade and we can smell it a mile off. Rather, give us a show that shows us Jesus as He really is. You have shown us that we as humans are far worse off that we think, now, save the show and show us Jesus loving us far more than we dare hope or dream possible. Give us a show that shows that Jesus loves us far more than we could ever deserve, but loves too much to leave us as we are. Show us the Biblical Gospel, ,and we will set our VCR’s; DVR’s, TIVO’s, and DVD recorders to watch.

Missed opportunities

Preach the Gospel at all times…when necessary, use words.

St. Francis of Assisi

As of the writing of this blog entry, the Book of Daniel has been pulled from the Nashville market. The local NBC affiliate received such an overwhelming response of dislike for the program, that the show will be replace with something else in that time slot. I am not surprised, but I am disappointed.

In my last entry, I pointed out there were some great opportunities to engage the culture. Instead of a large number of Christians saying “OK, Lets talk about homosexuality, addiction, drug abuse, warped marriages, bad relationships, love and the nature of Jesus”, a few very vocal people could not get past the offence to see the larger opportunity. It is sad, really. The church has taken a beating over the last 30 or 40 years for it’s stand on various issues. That does not mean that the position taken was wrong, but the approach could have been better.

There is a tendency in the church to run and hide under a rock and pretend that the “world” doesn’t exist, or to throw rocks at the world without regard for where those rocks hit. While the opposite extreme is not any better (ignoring or worse rubber stamping sin), we can call sin what it is, and then walk along side those who live life apart from Jesus and love them well. We need not fear that we will get trapped in their sin ourselves (although Scripture warns us to be prudent) we are called to go and preach the Gospel.

There is a watching world. It sees when we react in a knee-jerk way. It sees when we carelessly throw stones and needlessly harm people. It sees too much of this. It sees far too little of a church that is broken in repentance. It sees nothing of a church that serves in brokenness.

The Book of Daniel (the TV series) will most likely fall victim to another knee-jerk reaction by the evangelical community, and another opportunity will be lost to really engage the culture as opposed to running and hiding in fear, and we are the weaker for it.